Dutch Duo Wildlife Photography

Dutch Duo Wildlife Photography

by Claudia and PJ Potgieser

 

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   Grizzly Bear walked along our camper Alaska       

Who are we?                                                                                       Nederlands

A Dutch photography couple, living in a camper and traveling through North and South America to take pictures of wildlife. We started traveling in 1997 in an old Mercedes camper van. We went from Europe to the Middle East and Southern Africa and shipped it to the USA. In Alaska the 26 year old van gave up on us and we replaced it with a pick-up truck with slide in camper.

Although we make pictures of everything that moves, we are mostly fascinated by grizzly bears. All the wildlife we shoot are living in the wild. This takes a lot of patience.
In a summer snow storm in Yellowstone National Park (USA) we sat for hours waiting on the carcass of an elk calf, taken down by a grizzly bear. The bear was nowhere in sight, but a couple of coyotes came to visit. We were able to make some nice pictures of the coyotes. After waiting six hours the bear finally came back, but there wasn't much left of his prey.

The Peninsula Valdez (Argentina) is the only place on earth where in the Spring you can see the unique hunting method of the killer whales. The orca will grab sea lion puppies in the surf at such a propelling speed, that the orca will beach themselves on the shore.
We sat in the dunes staring at the sea lion colony for 26 days (!), before we could record the first beaching.

In 2003 we switched to digital and we love it!
 

We hope that this website exudes our enthusiasm for capturing wildlife images.
Claudia and Pieter-Jan Potgieser

Mount McKinley in Alaska    Free camping in Argentina      

Artic Circle in Canada on the Dempster Highway          Stuck on the salt flats for two days in Bolivia   

     Ushuaia most southern point of South America    Sunset in Mexico   

      Lake Yellowstone still frozen in June